Brewer Register of Historic Places

 

1.  350 North Main Street (Birthplace and childhood home of Civil War hero General Joshua Lawrence. Chamberlain)

Early American Cape Cod house, 1 storey, built in 1818 and rebuilt using dormers in 1900 into a Gothic Cottage style house.

This house located at 350 North Main Street was the birthplace and early childhood home of Civil War hero General Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. The Chamberlain family lived here until around 1835 when they moved to their newly built larger house at what is now 80 Chamberlain Street. The 1818 house is an Early American one storey Cape Cod house; rebuilt, incorporating dormers and a Palladian window about 1900 into a Gothic Cottage style house. The house was placed on the Brewer Register of Historic places by owner Dr. Daniel Moellentin in 2012.

 

2.  5 East Summer Street (Fiddlehead Inn)

Victorian 2.5 storey house with Queen Anne features, built around 1885

This well preserved house located at 5 East Summer was built around 1885 and is a fine example of a 2.5 storey Victorian with Queen Anne features. The interior has many excellent architectural features and is presently a vegetarian Bed and Breakfast. The house was placed on the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owner Saundra Haley.

 

3.  173 Wilson Street (Fannie Hardy Eckstorm house)

Classical Revival, mid 19th Century, 1.5 storeys with many original external details still present. Wide corner boards, door lights, likely original clapboards.

This house was built in the mid 1800s. In 1900, the house was purchased for Maine author and naturalist, Fannie Hardy Eckstorm by her father Manly Hardy. Fannie Hardy Eckstorm achieved national prominence for her writing and naturalist skills. She spent her life experiencing and writing about the Maine woods including its flora and fauna. She also archived Maine music and was recognized as an excellent folklorist. The house was placed on the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owner’s Ernest and Dr. Teresa Steele

 

4.  199 Wilson Street (Brewer Historical Society Clewley Museum)

Classical Revival, Built around 1880

This house was built on land purchased after the Civil War. The house was built about 1880 by I.W. Friend (Frend). It is an example of many family residences that were built as Brewer homesteads during this time. The Brewer Historical Society continues to remodel and renovate the building and showcase early 19th century life .The house was added to the Brewer Register of Historic Places by the Brewer Historical Society.

 

5.  60 Parker Street (Home and original business premises of Old Footman Dairy)

Victorian-Queen Anne 2.5 storey with attached carriage house. Built around 1880

This house was built in the 1880s. In the 1920’s the Footman family bought the property and until 1936, when a new brick building was built, served as the Footman Dairy. Many in Brewer remember with fondness the Footman Dairy Company. The house was placed on the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owner Ben Bubar.

 

6.  57 Parker Street: (Parsonage of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Brewer from 1873-1922) )

Early American Style, 1.5 storeys, Cape Cod with door window. Built pre-Civil War.

This house was built prior to the Civil War and was at one time owned by Joseph Baker who, in 1873, donated the property as a parsonage to the trustees of the Brewer Methodist-Episcopal Church (which is now at 40 South Main Street). It remained the parsonage until 1922 when a new parsonage (now gone) was purchased. The house was placed on the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owner William Grant Jr.

 

7.  7 Howard Street:

Federal Revival Style 2.5 storey built around 1870

This post Civil War house was built around 1870 by Roscoe Rodelphas Howard. Mr. Howard was a ship carpenter. The street on which the house resides is named after him. The house is an imposing structure due to historically correct narrow and tall architectural dimensions. The house was placed on the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owners James and Catherine Russell

 

8.  34 Brimmer Street:

Queen Ann 2.5 storey. Built in 1907

This Queen Anne 2.5 storey house exists with significant original architectural detail work intact. It features a rounded front tower and side bay window. The windows are original. This architectural style is Late 19th to early 20th Century.

This house was built in 1907 by Oscar S. Ellis, a master mariner. In the 1940’s the house became the residence of part of the Tucker family of Tucker Shoes. The Tucker Shoe Factory was a feature of Brewer for many years. The Tucker family owned the property until 1979. The house is presently going through extensive remodeling and refurbishing. It was added to the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owner John Gonya

 

9.  80 Chamberlain Street (homestead of Joshua L. Chamberlain Jr.)

Classical Revival 2.5 storey, door window lights, fine wooden corners, early turned    molding at roof. Built around 1835

This is one of the most historic homes in Brewer. Joshua Chamberlain Jr. (son of Joshua Chamberlain senior and father to Civil War General Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain) built this house around 1835 and moved his family from the cape style house at 350 North Main Street. The Chamberlain family and their heirs remained in the house until 1960. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain spent his boyhood here and remained until he left for Bowdoin College in southern Maine. The Chamberlain family remained in the house and daughter Sarah (Sae) remained there, after she had married C. O. Farrington and until her death. Their daughter Alice Mary Farrington lived there the rest of her life. The house was placed on the Brewer Register of Historical Places by owner Earl Sherwood

 

10.  Oak Hill Cemetery

Started in 1825

John Brewer donated land for a cemetery in 1825. He and many famous Brewer families are buried in Oak Hill. A listing of Cemetery plots is available at the Brewer City Hall or the Brewer Historical Society. The cemetery was placed on the Brewer Register of Historic Places by the Brewer Cemetery Committee and Brewer Parks and Recreation.

 

11.  North Brewer Cemetery

Acquired in 1840

The North Brewer Cemetery was acquired by the City of Brewer in 1840 although grave sites reveal that it was a burial site earlier than this date. Many of North Brewer Residents are buried here. The cemetery was placed on the Brewer Register of Historic Places by the Brewer Cemetery Committee and Brewer Parks and Recreation.

 

12.  Chamberlain Freedom Park

Built 1997

Chamberlain Freedom Park was developed after the destruction of the historic John Holyoke house because of the building of the Penobscot Bridge. The park is both a tribute to Civil War Hero and Brewer native General Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and to the role that Brewer played in the “Underground Railroad” in helping escaped slaves during their flight to freedom. The park is placed on the Brewer Register of Historic Places by the Brewer Historical Society along with park designer, State Representative, Richard Campbell and former historical Society president, Brian Higgins.

 

13.  105 Union Street

Classical Revival Built around 1870

This two story home is unique because of the seven gables architectural feature. The house was built around  1870 by William H. Maling,, a lumberman. The house was placed on the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owners Leon and Valerie Grant

 

14.  84 Day Road

New England Farmhouse . The homestead was started about 1860

This well maintained historic New England Farmhouse was built by Alfred S. Lambert, a farmer and Blacksmith. Mr. Lambert began obtaining land for what would become a 100 acre farm in the 1850’s.  The house has many original interior features and a beautiful setting. The house was placed on the Brewer  Register of Historic Places by owners Doug and Lisa Gardner.

 

15. 85 State Street

Late Greek Revival two storey house built around 1863. The double chimneys are very prominent and in many ways herald back to the American Federal style.

This house was built about 1863 by Randall Hopkins. It served as the Sirabella Photography Studio from   1954 to 2006. It was added to the Brewer Register of Historic Places by present owner Mario J. Sirabella.

 

16.  96 Union Street

Classic Revival one-and-one-half storey house built round 1855. The symmetrical 6 over 6 pane windows are   probably original as is the carriage house. There are many original details inside the house which have been carefully restored.

The house was the homestead to Leonard B. Smith (c. 1865) who was a Master Mariner and U.S. Consul to Curachao. It was added to the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owners William and Maria Higgins

17. 473 Day Road

Post and beam partial salt-box, 1.5 storey house with double opposing fireplaces. The house was built around   1840..

This lovely country house was the homestead of Calef and Lydia Day. Calef Day was a farmer who died in 1847 at the age of 41 and is buried in North Brewer Cemetery. Lydia Day lived until 81 years of age and died in 1881. It was added to the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owners Don and Susan Pierce

 

18.  First Methodist Church of Brewer, 40 South Main Street

Gothic Revival built in 1905

The original First Methodist Church was built in 1853. This was a frame building with high   roof, tower, steeple, and dual front doors. The minister at this time was Rev. A. C. Godfrey. In 1902 the church was condemned by the Brewer city inspector as being unsafe. The present church was dedicated in    1905. The building is an exceptional and significant structure with two jutting buttresses on the bell tower. The beautiful stained glass windows were made by Spence, Bell and Company of Boston. The structure has   details reminiscent of medieval churches and is fitted with fine material and attention to detail. The original  parsonage is a building on the Brewer Register of Historic Places at 57 Parker Street. The church was added to the Brewer Register of Historic Places by the congregation (with support from LaForest Mathews and  William Grant)

 

19.  439 North Main Street

Queen Anne Style 1887

This house was built by William B. Ferguson in 1887 on 100 acres of land originally owned by Oliver Farrington. Willard B. Ferguson was a farmer. This Queen Anne Style house was added to the Brewer Register of Historic Places by present owner Michelle Perkins.

 

20.  53 Parker Street

New England Farmhouse Style. C. 1877.

This house was built on property originally owned by John Holyoke. Mr. Holyoke sold the land to Chelsea  Westcott for a homestead around 1877. The house was added to the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owner William Grant.

 

21.  Brewer Auditorium

1939

The Brewer Auditorium was built in 1939 as part of a public works project funded by the United States government. Over the years the Auditorium has been a major part of Brewer’s history hosting many events and welcoming political notables, as well as providing a venue for national and local musicians, sports events and dances. It is the site of an American Legion Post and the official voting place for Brewer. The Auditorium was added to the Brewer Register of Historic Places by Brewer Parks and Recreation Director Ken Hanscom.

 

22 609 South Main Street

Georgian Colonial C. 1770

Home of Colonel John Brewer. John Brewer was the founding father of Brewer. The house was in almost complete disrepair when it was purchased by Charles Milan IV. Mr. Milan spent nine months renovating the house and uncovering the basic construction. A 1770 British coin in the wall attest to the age of the building. The house has been redone to be an airtight modern home. The house was added to the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owner Charles Milan IV

23. Getchell Street

New England Farmhouse style with influences of Greek Revival transitioning to Queen Anne C.1895

This house was built by Lyman B. Pollard. Mr. Pollard was a Civil War soldier. After the war he was a grocer with a business at the end of Burr Street. The house was added to the Brewer Register of Historic places by owner Lois Simpson.

24. 1102 North Main Street

New England Farmhouse style with barn and El. Solid granite foundation.    C. 1845

This classic New England Farmhouse was built be Aeneas Sinclair around 1845. He was a farmer. The house has been owned by four generations of Dunhams and Matsons.  It was placed on the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owner Rev. Dorothy Matson.

  1. Somerset Street

Federal style former Brewer High School and Brewer Middle School. It has been converted into affordable senior housing. The first high school class began in the fall of 1926

This building was completed in 1926 as the high school for Brewer. In 1967 it became Brewer Middle School when the new high school was built on Parkway South. In 1967 the building was vacated when the new Pre-K through 8th grade Brewer Community School was completed on Parkway South and Pendleton Street..  In 2011 the empty building was given to the Brewer Housing Authority and converted into affordable senior housing. The building remodeling was completed in 2011. It is now called Somerset Place and is on the National Register of Historic Places. It was also placed on the Brewer Register of Historic Places by Gordon Stitham, Executive Director of the Brewer Housing Authority

 

  1.        45 Washington Street

Neo-Classic New England home       C. 1862

This 2 storey house was built around 1862 by George Rider. Mr. Rider was a carpenter who specialized in Italianate buildings and cabinet making. He was known to be among the best. During his lifetime he was well liked and respected by all those who knew him. George Rider was an immediate neighbor of Joshua Chamberlain as his property extended at that time to Chamberlain Street. The house remained in the Rider family for four generations until 2015. The house was added to the Brewer Register of Historic Places by owner Sherry Wheelden